Walking & Cycling

36 mile Gwastedyn Church Trail

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
Gwastedyn Church Trail

This circular 36 mile trail over an established pilgrimage route begins and ends in Rhayader and Cwmdeuddwr.  Linking seven historic churches, the route uses mountain paths, lanes and old railway lines to guide you into the heart of our magnificent mountain, river and lake country.  To follow the Trail takes you into a world of history and literature derived from the world of the Celtic Saints, the Romans and Romano British, the Normans, the Welsh princes, the medieval monks through to the romantic poets and the Victorians.

Mae’r llwybr hwn, sy’n dilyn llwybr pererindod sefydledig, yn 36 milltir o hyd ac yn dechrau a diweddu yn Rhaeadr a Chwmdeuddwr.  Mae’r llwybr sy’n cysylltu saith o eglwysi hanesyddol, yn eich tywys drwy ardal odidog mynyddoedd yr Elenydd gyda’i hafonydd a’i llynnoedd, dros lwybrau mynyddig ac ar hyd ffyrdd a hen reilffyrdd gwledig. Mae dilyn y Llwybr yn eich cyflwyno i fyd hanes a llenyddiaeth o gyfnod y Seintiau Celtaidd, y Rhufeiniaid, y Brythoniaid Rhufeinig, y Normaniaid, y Tywysogion Cymreig, mynachod y canol oesoedd, hyd at y beirdd rhamantaidd ac oes Fictoria.


Route Name: Gwastedyn Church Trail
Length of Route: 36 miles
Walking Difficulty: Strenuous
Start Location: St Clement's Church

This trail is divided into more manageable six sections - see our Walking and Cycling page.

The Gwastedyn Trail is funded by the Community Welcome Scheme, which is managed by Powys County Council Tourism Section and is one of sixteen Rural Development Plan projects, which aims to assist local communities with small scale community based tourism projects.
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Rhayader Town Trail

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible
Rhayader Town Trail

Beginning from the Smithfield Market this walk will take about an hour at a leisurely pace allowing for time to stop and look. It is all accessible for wheel chairs and push chairs although there is a steep 50m climb in Waun Capel Parc.

Print off your copy of the Town Trail and map and learn about Rhayader’s past qnd appreciate its architecture.


Route Name: Rhayader Town History Trail
Length of Route: 2
Walking Difficulty: Easy
Start Location: Smithfield Market, North Street, Rhayader
Beginning from the Smithfield Market the walk will take about an hour at a leisurely pace allowing for time to stop and look. It is all accessible for
wheel chairs and push chairs although there is a steep 50m climb in Waun Capel Parc.

Offa's Dyke Path

rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-walking
Offa's Dyke

Built in the 8th century by King Offa as a boundary between Wales and England the dyke is now a national walking trail within easy reach of Rhayader.


Following the border between England and Wales for 182 miles (293km), the Offa’s Dyke Path National Trail passes through some of the most spectacular scenery either country has to offer. The trail largely follows the ancient Offa’s Dyke, an 8m high earth embankment built in the 8th century by King Offa as a boundary between Wales and England, and guarantees the most commanding views of the surrounding countryside.

Waun Capel Park Wildlife Walk

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
pets-welcome
Waun Capel Park Wildlife Walk

A circular walk from car park at the end of the Gasworks Lane off Bridge Street. where there are picnic benches by the river. The walk makes a circuit of Waun Capel Park and the castle mound, a distance of just over one mile / 2 kilometres that takes about an hour to enjoy. Parts of the walk suitable for push chairs are marked on the map.


Geolocation
Route Name: Waun Capel Wildlife Walk
Length of Route: 1 mile / 2 kilometres
Walking Difficulty: Easy
Start Location: Gasworks Lane, off Bridge Street

Rhayader has a wonderful variety of wild plants and animals living among its buildings, parks and gardens. The fast flowing, boulder strewn River Wye passes right through the town forming a very important natural corridor along which wildlife travels, enriching the town for enjoyment of everyone. 

Lon Las Cymru National Cycle Route 8

suitable-for-cycling
suitable-for-moutain-biking
Lon Las Cymru

Lon Las Cymru National Cycle Route 8 
The 240 mile jewel in Wales’s cycle-touring crown, weaving a scenic route from Anglesey (in North Wales) to the Bristol Channel, passing through some magnificent Mid Wales landscapes along the way. Known as the Lon Las Cymru fully open and signed between Cardiff and Holyhead (Anglesey) via Brecon, Builth Wells, Machynlleth, Porthmadog and Bangor.


The route is described here from Cardiff to Holyhead but is signed in both directions. Opened in 1995, the route runs down the whole length of Wales and is one of the toughest of all the long distance routes on the National Cycle Network, tougher even than the famous Sea to Sea (C2C). As such it represents an excellent challenge for anyone looking for a spectacular 5-7 day ride.

The route is currently 257 miles long.

Route Sections

1. Cardiff to Llanidloes
The Lôn Las Cymru (South) cycle route starts or finishes in either Cardiff Bay (National Route 8) or Chepstow (National Route 42 - this option joins National Route 8 at Glasbury). Route 8 follows the mainly traffic-free Taff Trail (pdf) between Cardiff and Brecon and then rolling country lanes through Mid Wales, following the approximate course of the River Wye north from Glasbury. Glasbury to Holyhead also forms part of EuroVelo 2.

Map: Lôn Las Cymru South and Lôn Las Cymru guidebookCeltic Trail East also shows Cardiff or Chepstow to Glasbury.

2. Llanidloes to Holyhead
The Lôn Las Cymru (North) climbs steadly out of Llanidloes following the upper valley of the River Severn to the highest point on National Route 8 at 510m before dropping down to Machynlleth. There are two route options between Machynlleth and Porthmadog. A more coastal route includes the Mawddach Trail between Dolgellau and Barmouth and takes in Harlech, whilst the inland route passes through Dolgellau, Coed-y-Brenin Forest and Trawsfynydd. The routes rejoin at Penrhydeudraeth and continue to Caernarfon on the Lôn Eifion trail and then to Bangor on the Lôn Las Menai. After crossing the Menai Strait via the Menai Suspension Bridge onto Anglesey the route follows quiet roads across the island to Holyhead.

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