Arts, Culture and Heritage

Elan Valley Visitor Centre

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
parking-on-site
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-cycling
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible
Elan Valley Visitor Centre
Elan Valley Visitors Centre, Elan Valley, Rhayader, Powys LD6 5HP

The Elan Valley Visitor Centre is operated by Dwr Cymru Welsh Water and is set in a fantastic location against a spectacular backdrop of a Victorian stone dam.

It is the perfect starting point for your visit to the area. There's something for everyone; Information Desk; Shop; Cafe; Easy disabled access; Toilets; Large car park and coach parking area; Children's play area; Large picnic area; Easy parking; Education and interactive learning play an important role in the design of our centre and a Free exhibition. 

Entrance to the Visitor Centre is free, and the £2 parking charge covers you for the whole of the Estate's car parks, all day.

Season tickets for car parking are also available, please ask at the Information Desk. They cost £15 and last for 12 months.


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Opening Times: 10.00am - 4.00pm (except Christmas day)
Entry Cost: £2 Parking fee
Contact: Elan Rangers
Tel: 01597 810880

A visit to Elan Valley never fails to delight and inspire. We are custodians of a beautiful area stretching 72 square miles with historic landscapes and thriving wildlife. The dams and reservoirs, the working legacy of remarkable Victorian engineering, add to the captivating and ever changing scenery. You can stroll, picnic or hike; cycle or mountain bike; bird watch, fish or safari!

We operate as 'not-for-profit' so the team who work here can concentrate on safeguarding this special place and ensuring you make the most of your visit. As we say in these parts, Croeso! We look forward to welcoming you to Elan Valley.

Distance from town centre: 3

Elan Valley Visitor Centre WalksElan Valley Bike HireElan Valley Visitor Centre CafeElan Valley Dams

Exploring Mid Wales

rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-cycling
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking
Exploring Mid Wales
Mid Wales

Exploring Mid Wales - bespoke guided tours for the curious mind.


Entry Cost: From £19 per head
Contact: Rob Rees
Tel: 07914 265654

We offer bespoke guided tours, walks and cycle rides in the Mid Wales area. If you would like to make the most of your stay then allow us to show you some of the many hidden gems of the area. We are keen walkers and mountain bikers. We also offer specialist historical, geographical and literary tours.

Distance from town centre: 1

Llanwrthwl Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking

Llanwrthwl lies on the River Wye south of Rhayader. To the north west is the RSPB nature reserve called Carngafallt, a heather clad hill with slopes clothed in beautiful ancient hanging oak woodlands and thorn scattered fridd. Gafallt was King Arthur’s dog, and legend says that he left his paw print in a stone somewhere on Carngafallt. It was also here that a second hoard of gold jewellery was found – a set of bronze age torques, now in the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff. In the churchyard next to the parish church of St Gwrthwl is a huge standing stone.


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Distance from town centre: 4

Ysfa to Llanwrthwl Walk

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-walking
Ysfa Church

This 3 mile walk beginning from St Mark's Church (Grid Ref: SN 991 644), follows forest and farm tracks and crosses the River Wye to reach Llanwrthwl.


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Route Name: Gwastedyn Church Trail - Section 5
Length of Route: 3
Start Location: St. Mark's Church

St Mark’s Church, Ysfa

A Victorian Church built of stone with brick interior between 1870 and 1871.  Its main claim to fame is that the first stone was laid by Revd Kilvert, the diarist, in 1871 and his diaries describe the opening which was somewhat lively due to children playing in the lime and the wind blowing it on to the gathering, smarting their eyes.  There was also something of a commotion in the tent resulting in it being torn.  There is a beautiful Victorian model of the Church inside.  The church is said to have been built by the local gentry for worship by their servants.

Eglwys Sant Mark, Ysfa

Eglwys Fictoraidd a adeiladwyd rhwng 1870 a 1871.  Mae’r eglwys wedi’i hadeiladu o gerrig gyda briciau ar y tu mewn.  Mae’r eglwys yn enwog oherwydd gosodwyd y garreg gyntaf gan y Parch Kilvert, y dyddiadurwr, ym 1871.  Mae ei ddyddiaduron yn disgrifio’r agoriad a oedd braidd yn fywiog oherwydd i’r plant chwarae yn y calch a chwythodd y gwynt y calch ar y dyrfa gan losgi eu llygaid.  Cafwyd hefyd rhywfaint o gynnwrf yn y babell a chafwyd ei rhwygo yn ystod y digwyddiad.  Mae model Fictoraidd hardd o’r Eglwys y tu mewn.  Dywedir bod yr eglwys wedi cael ei hadeiladu gan y bonedd lleol fel lle addoli ar gyfer eu gweision a’u morwynion.

Distance from town centre: 5

Abbeycwmhir Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-cycling
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking
Abbeycwmhir Rhayader

Abbey Cwm Hir (Abaty’r Cwm Hir) - The Abbey in the Long Valley. Here, in 1143 the building of an Abbey commenced which had it been completed, would have been the largest in Wales and where the headless remains of Llewelyn ap Gruffydd (Llewelyn ap Gruffudd) the last of the Welsh Princes, are reputed to have been buried. The abbey ruins can still be seen and nearby the Hall at Abbeycwmhir has been splendidly restored, decorated and furnished and is a visitor attraction open by appointment and well worth a visit.

 


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Abbeycwmhir, a village situated in the centre of Wales amongst the Cambrian mountains in the old county of Radnorshire steeped in history and natural beauty,virtually undiscovered by the modern world.

The name Abbeycwmhir derives from the Cistercian monastery built here in 1143 and translates as Abbey in the long (hir) valley (cwm). Abbeycwmhir is also the burial place of the last native Prince of Wales "Llewellyn the Last".His head was taken to London and his body buried here,there is a memorial stone for him in the ruins of the old Abbey. The village sits in the base of the valley close to the Clewedog brook and is surrounded by hills.Glyndwrs Way national walking trail and cycle route 25 pass through the village making it an ideal location for these activities. Hanging oak forests, rocky outcrops and unpolluted farmland make this the best place in the country to watch rarities such as red kites, peregrines, pied flycatchers and redstart,daily feeding can be seen at the UK's leading Red Kite Centre, Gigrin Farm just six miles away. Over 150 kites gather for the daily afternoon feeding sessions at Gigrin Kite Centre, not to mention scores of buzzards and ravens.

Distance from town centre: 7

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