Things To Do

Welsh Royal Crystal

family-friendly
parking-on-site
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
wheelchair-accessible
Welsh Royal Crystal
Unit 6Brynberth Ind. EstRhayaderPowysLD6 5EN

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Opening Times: Opening Hours Monday to Friday - 9.00am - 5.00pm Saturday and Sunday - 10.00am - 4.00pm
Entry Cost: Free
Contact: David Thomas
Tel: 01597 811005

Centuries old handcrafting skills are used in the Welsh Royal Crystal glass making workshops. All crystal pieces are individually hand cut, thus capturing the clarity, brilliance and sharpness of cut associated with quality crystal ware. The range of shapes and decorative cuts embraces Traditional, Intaglio and Celtic design influences, which are unique to Welsh Royal Crystal products. The most stringent quality standards are applied to ensure that only the finest quality is stamped with the Welsh Royal Crystal assay mark - the traditional Welsh Dragon stamp represents a symbol of quality. Here at Welsh Royal Crystal, you can enjoy a workshop tour which features a demonstration by our Master Craftsman. Afterwards visitors can browse in the shop stocked with Welsh Royal products at very affordable prices. Parties and groups are well catered for and ample parking space is available for coaches and cars. Refreshments are provided in the coffee shop.

Llanwrthwl Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking

Llanwrthwl lies on the River Wye south of Rhayader. To the north west is the RSPB nature reserve called Carngafallt, a heather clad hill with slopes clothed in beautiful ancient hanging oak woodlands and thorn scattered fridd. Gafallt was King Arthur’s dog, and legend says that he left his paw print in a stone somewhere on Carngafallt. It was also here that a second hoard of gold jewellery was found – a set of bronze age torques, now in the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff. In the churchyard next to the parish church of St Gwrthwl is a huge standing stone.


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Distance from town centre: 4

36 mile Gwastedyn Church Trail

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
Gwastedyn Church Trail

This circular 36 mile trail over an established pilgrimage route begins and ends in Rhayader and Cwmdeuddwr.  Linking seven historic churches, the route uses mountain paths, lanes and old railway lines to guide you into the heart of our magnificent mountain, river and lake country.  To follow the Trail takes you into a world of history and literature derived from the world of the Celtic Saints, the Romans and Romano British, the Normans, the Welsh princes, the medieval monks through to the romantic poets and the Victorians.

Mae’r llwybr hwn, sy’n dilyn llwybr pererindod sefydledig, yn 36 milltir o hyd ac yn dechrau a diweddu yn Rhaeadr a Chwmdeuddwr.  Mae’r llwybr sy’n cysylltu saith o eglwysi hanesyddol, yn eich tywys drwy ardal odidog mynyddoedd yr Elenydd gyda’i hafonydd a’i llynnoedd, dros lwybrau mynyddig ac ar hyd ffyrdd a hen reilffyrdd gwledig. Mae dilyn y Llwybr yn eich cyflwyno i fyd hanes a llenyddiaeth o gyfnod y Seintiau Celtaidd, y Rhufeiniaid, y Brythoniaid Rhufeinig, y Normaniaid, y Tywysogion Cymreig, mynachod y canol oesoedd, hyd at y beirdd rhamantaidd ac oes Fictoria.


Route Name: Gwastedyn Church Trail
Length of Route: 36 miles
Walking Difficulty: Strenuous
Start Location: St Clement's Church

This trail is divided into more manageable six sections - see our Walking and Cycling page.

The Gwastedyn Trail is funded by the Community Welcome Scheme, which is managed by Powys County Council Tourism Section and is one of sixteen Rural Development Plan projects, which aims to assist local communities with small scale community based tourism projects.
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CARAD Rhayader Museum and Gallery

family-friendly
parking-on-site
rainy-day-activity
wheelchair-accessible
Discover your roots_Mid Wales
Rhayader Museum and Gallery, East Street, Rhayader LD6 5ER

Discover the stories of Rhayader and its region. Experience the rich heritage of the area through oral history, film, photographs and activities. Share your stories to leave for future generations.


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Opening Times: Tues - Sat 10.00am - 4.00pm
Entry Cost: Adults- £4 Concessions- £3
Contact: Rachael Storer
Tel: 01597 810561/810192

Rhayader Museum and Gallery looks small and compact from the outside but, once inside, you will find a downstairs temporary Exhibition Gallery where there are a variety of exhibitions throughout the year. The building is fully accessible with a lift to the upper floor.

Upstairs in the Museum Gallery there are films to watch, and more than 50 oral histories to listen to along with a vast array of objects to look at. All of which help to tell the story of Rhayader from the early ages of man though to the current generation of people who live in and around the town.

Rhayader Museum and Gallery is run by CARAD, an independent charity. Currently, we charge an entry fee because we like to be able to use the money we raise to develop new exhibitions and projects.


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Gilfach Nature Reserve

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
parking-on-site
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible
Gilfach Visitor Centre Marteg
Signposted off the A470 about 3 miles north of Rhayader

Visitor centre – phone for opening times and event details: watch for butterflies, otters and leaping salmon, explore habitats rich in rare and fascinating wildlife, guided wildlife walks and talks.

See more here.


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Tel: 01597 823298

Gilfach is a traditional Radnorshire hill farm that has remained unimproved since the 1960's. Radnorshire Wildlife Trust purchased the farm back in 1988 and with fantastic support from volunteers, spent the next few years renovating the longhouse and barn; restoring the ancient field boundaries and developing a management plan that puts wildlife at its heart.

The farm is registered as an organic holding and is entered in the Tir Gofal agri-environment scheme and the Better Woodlands for Wales scheme. A local farmer works in partnership with us to manage the land for conservation, grazing it using traditional breeds like Welsh black cows and local Welsh mountain-cross sheep. Currently there are some black, horned sheep that look more like goats! These are a black Welsh Mountain/Hebridean cross.

The freehold of this 410 acre (166 ha) reserve was purchased in 1988 with very generous donations from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, Countryside Commission, World Wide Fund for Nature, Oakdale Trust, W.A. Cadbury Charitable Trust and many other charitable trusts and individuals.

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