Things To Do

The Wye Valley Walk

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Rhayader Wye Valley Walk

Being one of the oldest towns on the River Wye, Rhayader is an ideal base from which to explore sections of the Wye Valley Walk that run north and south from the town and for walkers of the whole route it is an excellent place to stop and stay awhile.


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The 136 Mile (218km) Wye Valley Walk starts in Chepstow and follows the River Wye northwards through Herefordshire, entering Powys at Hay-on-Wye. It continues through the market towns of Builth Wells and Rhayader, continuing towards the Hafren Forest, north of Llanidloes, where it joins the Severn Way.

Offa's Dyke Path

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Offa's Dyke

Built in the 8th century by King Offa as a boundary between Wales and England the dyke is now a national walking trail within easy reach of Rhayader.


Following the border between England and Wales for 182 miles (293km), the Offa’s Dyke Path National Trail passes through some of the most spectacular scenery either country has to offer. The trail largely follows the ancient Offa’s Dyke, an 8m high earth embankment built in the 8th century by King Offa as a boundary between Wales and England, and guarantees the most commanding views of the surrounding countryside.

Exploring Mid Wales

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Exploring Mid Wales
Mid Wales

Exploring Mid Wales - bespoke guided tours for the curious mind.


Entry Cost: From £19 per head
Contact: Rob Rees
Tel: 07914 265654

We offer bespoke guided tours, walks and cycle rides in the Mid Wales area. If you would like to make the most of your stay then allow us to show you some of the many hidden gems of the area. We are keen walkers and mountain bikers. We also offer specialist historical, geographical and literary tours.

Distance from town centre: 1

Elan Valley Visitor Centre

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Elan Valley Visitor Centre
Elan Valley Visitors Centre, Elan Valley, Rhayader, Powys LD6 5HP

The Elan Valley Visitor Centre is operated by Dwr Cymru Welsh Water and is set in a fantastic location against a spectacular backdrop of a Victorian stone dam.

It is the perfect starting point for your visit to the area. There's something for everyone; Information Desk; Shop; Cafe; Easy disabled access; Toilets; Large car park and coach parking area; Children's play area; Large picnic area; Easy parking; Education and interactive learning play an important role in the design of our centre and a Free exhibition. 

Entrance to the Visitor Centre is free, and the £2 parking charge covers you for the whole of the Estate's car parks, all day.

Season tickets for car parking are also available, please ask at the Information Desk. They cost £15 and last for 12 months.


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Opening Times: 10.00am - 4.00pm (except Christmas day)
Entry Cost: £2 Parking fee
Contact: Elan Rangers
Tel: 01597 810880

A visit to Elan Valley never fails to delight and inspire. We are custodians of a beautiful area stretching 72 square miles with historic landscapes and thriving wildlife. The dams and reservoirs, the working legacy of remarkable Victorian engineering, add to the captivating and ever changing scenery. You can stroll, picnic or hike; cycle or mountain bike; bird watch, fish or safari!

We operate as 'not-for-profit' so the team who work here can concentrate on safeguarding this special place and ensuring you make the most of your visit. As we say in these parts, Croeso! We look forward to welcoming you to Elan Valley.

Distance from town centre: 3

Elan Valley Visitor Centre WalksElan Valley Bike HireElan Valley Visitor Centre CafeElan Valley Dams

St. Harmon Village Visit

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St Harmon, to the north of Rhayader, with its Church of St. Garmon, was for a short time served by the famous diarist, Reverend Francis Kilvert (1840-1879) whose writing about the ordinary people and the way they lived is recognized as a minor classic. The parish of St Harmon contains numerous ancient remains including tumuli and long barrows, the graves of Neolithic people, and the bronze age ridgeway, a road that ran from the Kerry Hills to Carmarthenshire.

St Harmon have their own football team playing from 'The Bryn', ask the locals when their next home game is if you'd like to watch.


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Distance from town centre: 3

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