Things To Do

St. Harmon Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
suitable-for-walking

St Harmon, to the north of Rhayader, with its Church of St. Garmon, was for a short time served by the famous diarist, Reverend Francis Kilvert (1840-1879) whose writing about the ordinary people and the way they lived is recognized as a minor classic. The parish of St Harmon contains numerous ancient remains including tumuli and long barrows, the graves of Neolithic people, and the bronze age ridgeway, a road that ran from the Kerry Hills to Carmarthenshire.

St Harmon have their own football team playing from 'The Bryn', ask the locals when their next home game is if you'd like to watch.


Geolocation
Distance from town centre: 3

Glyndwr's Way

family-friendly
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-walking
Glyndwr's Way

Following in the footsteps of Owain Glyndwr, this trail comes within a few miles of Rhayader.


This 132 mile (213km) National Trail is set in the heart of Mid Wales’ breathtaking countryside, and is dedicated to the 15th century Welsh Warrior and self proclaimed Prince of Wales, Owain Glyndwr. The trail starts in Knighton, on the English border where it links with the Offa’s Dyke Path. Running in a giant horse-shoe, it passes through the market towns of mid Wales on route to Machynlleth, and back again across Wales to Welshpool, close to the border with England.

Abbeycwmhir Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
pets-welcome
rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-cycling
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking
Abbeycwmhir Rhayader

Abbey Cwm Hir (Abaty’r Cwm Hir) - The Abbey in the Long Valley. Here, in 1143 the building of an Abbey commenced which had it been completed, would have been the largest in Wales and where the headless remains of Llewelyn ap Gruffydd (Llewelyn ap Gruffudd) the last of the Welsh Princes, are reputed to have been buried. The abbey ruins can still be seen and nearby the Hall at Abbeycwmhir has been splendidly restored, decorated and furnished and is a visitor attraction open by appointment and well worth a visit.

 


Geolocation

Abbeycwmhir, a village situated in the centre of Wales amongst the Cambrian mountains in the old county of Radnorshire steeped in history and natural beauty,virtually undiscovered by the modern world.

The name Abbeycwmhir derives from the Cistercian monastery built here in 1143 and translates as Abbey in the long (hir) valley (cwm). Abbeycwmhir is also the burial place of the last native Prince of Wales "Llewellyn the Last".His head was taken to London and his body buried here,there is a memorial stone for him in the ruins of the old Abbey. The village sits in the base of the valley close to the Clewedog brook and is surrounded by hills.Glyndwrs Way national walking trail and cycle route 25 pass through the village making it an ideal location for these activities. Hanging oak forests, rocky outcrops and unpolluted farmland make this the best place in the country to watch rarities such as red kites, peregrines, pied flycatchers and redstart,daily feeding can be seen at the UK's leading Red Kite Centre, Gigrin Farm just six miles away. Over 150 kites gather for the daily afternoon feeding sessions at Gigrin Kite Centre, not to mention scores of buzzards and ravens.

Distance from town centre: 7

Valley View Falconry

family-friendly
parking-at-start-point
parking-on-site
suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible
Valley View Falconry
Valley View Upper, Llwyn Lane, Nantmel, Nr Rhayader, LD6 5PE

Falconry handling experience.


Geolocation
Opening Times: By booking only
Entry Cost: See our website
Contact: Valley View Falconry
Tel: 07849 608 633

Sessions last roughly 2 hours and you will get to meet our variety of birds of prey from around the world. We also do gift vouchers. Various breeds of owls, hawks etc. We also have Alpaca's, Rheas, Donkeys, Sheep, any breeds of chickens, Pygmy goats. Tea, coffee refreshments available.

Distance from town centre: 4

Offa's Dyke Path

rainy-day-activity
suitable-for-walking
Offa's Dyke

Built in the 8th century by King Offa as a boundary between Wales and England the dyke is now a national walking trail within easy reach of Rhayader.


Following the border between England and Wales for 182 miles (293km), the Offa’s Dyke Path National Trail passes through some of the most spectacular scenery either country has to offer. The trail largely follows the ancient Offa’s Dyke, an 8m high earth embankment built in the 8th century by King Offa as a boundary between Wales and England, and guarantees the most commanding views of the surrounding countryside.

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