Things To Do

St. Harmon Village Visit

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St Harmon, to the north of Rhayader, with its Church of St. Garmon, was for a short time served by the famous diarist, Reverend Francis Kilvert (1840-1879) whose writing about the ordinary people and the way they lived is recognized as a minor classic. The parish of St Harmon contains numerous ancient remains including tumuli and long barrows, the graves of Neolithic people, and the bronze age ridgeway, a road that ran from the Kerry Hills to Carmarthenshire.

St Harmon have their own football team playing from 'The Bryn', ask the locals when their next home game is if you'd like to watch.


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Distance from town centre: 3

Waun Capel Park

family-friendly
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pets-welcome
suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible

Children’s play area, bowling green, multi-use games area including basketball, tennis and floodlit five-a-side football pitch. Situated next to the River Wye providing an excellent picnic spot and play area.


This is Rhayader’s premier play facility. It is located in the town’s Waun Capel Park that lies next to the River Wye. As well as the play area the park also includes a kick about grassed area that lies adjacent to the play area,tennis courts, bowling green, basket ball court and 5 a side football pitch.There is also a camping and a touring/static caravan park lying just to the north of the Waun Capel Park and the Park is linked to the Wye Valley Walk which runs through the site.

Access to the site is by foot only and is only accessible to the disabled visitor via the Wye Valley Walk which enters the site via a riverside footpath. Other pedestrian access can be gained from the town, but this is via steeply sloping pathways that lead down into the park.

The items of play on site include; Multiple sets of swings, a see-saw- various springies, a slide, a bucket spinner, climbing frame and a multi play item. There are also seats and a picnic table available for use. 


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Llanwrthwl Village Visit

family-friendly
parking-on-site
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking

Llanwrthwl lies on the River Wye south of Rhayader. To the north west is the RSPB nature reserve called Carngafallt, a heather clad hill with slopes clothed in beautiful ancient hanging oak woodlands and thorn scattered fridd. Gafallt was King Arthur’s dog, and legend says that he left his paw print in a stone somewhere on Carngafallt. It was also here that a second hoard of gold jewellery was found – a set of bronze age torques, now in the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff. In the churchyard next to the parish church of St Gwrthwl is a huge standing stone.


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Distance from town centre: 4

Elan & Claerwen Valleys

family-friendly
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parking-on-site
pets-welcome
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suitable-for-cycling
suitable-for-moutain-biking
suitable-for-walking
wheelchair-accessible
Craig Goch Elan Valley Dams

To the west of Rhayader is the Elan Valley Estate, owned by Welsh Water and managed by the Elan Valley Trust, the series of reservoirs set in the outstanding scenery of the Elan and Claerwen Valleys have created a home for wildlife and a place to inspire us all.


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Walking: With 72 sqaure miles of Elan Valley Estate, walking routes in this our part of the Cambrian Mountains is spectacular. See a selection of the Elan Valley walks here.

History: In the 19th century, at the time of the Industrial Revolution Joseph Chamberlain, then leader of Birmingham City Council, set about finding a clean water supply for the City.

The Elan and Claerwen Valleys had been identified by the engineer James Mansergh as having the best potential for water storage - with
• An average annual rainfall of 72 inches (1830mm). 
• Narrow downstream valleys which made building the dams easier. 
• Impermeable bedrock preventing the water seeping away. 
• Altitude - the area is mostly higher than Birmingham enabling the water to be transported by gravity alone, without the need to be pumped.

An Act of Parliament was passed for the compulsory purchase of the area and in 1893 the building work began. Over 100 occupants of the Elan Valley had to move, only landowners received compensation payments. Many buildings were demolished, among them 2 manor houses, 18 farms, a school and a church (which was replaced by the corporation as the Nantgwyllt Church).

A railway line was constructed to transport the workers and thousands of tonnes of building material each day and a village of wooden huts was purpose built to house many of the workers on the site of the present Elan Village.
The Elan Valley Dams were officially opened by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra on 21st July 1904, and the later built Claerwen Dam was opened by Queen Elizabeth II in 1952.

Present Day: The dams and reservoirs of the Elan Estate are situated within an area of outstanding scenic beauty. They provide a lasting amenity in their own right for visitors to enjoy. The protection of the water catchment area to prevent pollution of the reservoirs has safeguarded the habitats of numerous species of flora and fauna and now the 70 square miles of moorland, bog, woodland, river and reservoir are of national importance for their diversity of lower plants (ferns, mosses, lichens and liverworts) and the Estate is the most important area for land birds in Wales.

Distance from town centre: 3

CARAD Rhayader Museum and Gallery

family-friendly
parking-on-site
rainy-day-activity
wheelchair-accessible
Discover your roots_Mid Wales
Rhayader Museum and Gallery, East Street, Rhayader LD6 5ER

Discover the stories of Rhayader and its region. Experience the rich heritage of the area through oral history, film, photographs and activities. Share your stories to leave for future generations.


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Opening Times: Tues - Sat 10.00am - 4.00pm
Entry Cost: Adults- £4 Concessions- £3
Contact: Rachael Storer
Tel: 01597 810561/810192

Rhayader Museum and Gallery looks small and compact from the outside but, once inside, you will find a downstairs temporary Exhibition Gallery where there are a variety of exhibitions throughout the year. The building is fully accessible with a lift to the upper floor.

Upstairs in the Museum Gallery there are films to watch, and more than 50 oral histories to listen to along with a vast array of objects to look at. All of which help to tell the story of Rhayader from the early ages of man though to the current generation of people who live in and around the town.

Rhayader Museum and Gallery is run by CARAD, an independent charity. Currently, we charge an entry fee because we like to be able to use the money we raise to develop new exhibitions and projects.


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